What Charles Copeman Achieved at Robe River

Charles Copeman died on June 27. At the annual conference of the H.R. Nicholls Society eleven days later, his role in the 1986 Robe River conflict was remembered by former president Ray Evans. He described Charles as the Daniel confronting a den of the great and good of Australian politics.

Charles was also remembered in the award of this year’s Copeman Medal for service to freedom of employment to Dr Chris Roberts, chief executive officer of Cochlear Limited. In years past, Charles himself was present for the award of the medal. This year, the award was honoured by the presence of Charles’s widow, Alison.

As recalled at the Thanksgiving Service for his life on July 3 at St James’s Church, Sydney, Charles Copeman was a “business leader of lasting impact”, due in part to his reform of work practices at the Robe River iron ore mine. This brief note is to recall the Robe River affair of twenty-seven years ago. Read more

An inquiry into unions

News.com.au reports:

THERE is high level Coalition support for a broad ranging judicial inquiry into the union movement – and Michael Williamson’s guilty plea in relation to the Health Services Union adds to the momentum.

 

Senior Government figures argue there is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to exploit public disgust over corrupt union officials and expose the entire movement to a royal commission.
They are keen to get cracking on draft terms of reference that would allow a high powered investigation into allegations of corruption across the union fraternity.

 

 

Ambulance Union Caught Faking Photos

The Herald Sun Reports:

The State Government released CCTV footage taken in Frankston Hospital in July that appears to show Ambulance Victoria employees lining patients up in a corridor in order to take a photograph.

 

According to a letter to the Health Department from the acting CEO of Peninsula Health, which manages Frankston Hospital, the movement of these patients by paramedics was “inappropriate” and there was “no clinical reason” for a patient to be moved to this “already crowded ­location” and out of the hospital’s emergency department. Read more