HR Nicholls Society member Kelly O’Dwyer appointed Assistant Treasurer and Minister for Small Business

I am pleased to advise that our member Kelly O’Dwyer MP (for Higgins, Vic) has been appointed to the ministry of Prime Minister Turnbull.

I have congratulated her on behalf of the board.  Kelly is the second member of the society – after Senator Bob Day – to recently make a name in parliament.

Kelly’s portfolios of  Treasury and Small Business provide a practical setting for the IR changes the society has advocated.

The society welcomes also the appointment of Michaelia Cash as Minister for Employment and looks forward to being in touch with her.

Adam Bisits
(president)

Notes

  1. Annual conference.The HR Nicholls Society annual conference “The Fair Work Act – an Australian idiosyncracy” will be held on Saturday 27 November in Melbourne. Details soon.
  2. IR changes  the  HR Nicholls Society has sought are these
  1. Terms of employment to only relate to genuine employment issues.
  1. Employment agreements to be binding.
  2. Unfair dismissal jurisdiction to be reined in –   beginning with the recommendations of the draft Productivity Commission report on the Workplace Relations Framework, August 2015.
  1. Allow employees the opportunity to choose their union freely.
  1. Restore the Australian Building and Construction Commission.
  2. On transfer of business, allow new employers to apply their own industrial terms to incoming employees.

Media Release: Unfreeze IR debate and action

The president of the HR Nicholls Society, Adam Bisits, has welcomed Mr Turnbull’s focus on the economy and a commitment to a proper debate on economic issues.  A focus on the economy by new prime minister Turnbull requires amongst other things greater freedom of employment.

“The freeze on the practical problems with the IR system has to end – extending from the government’s rejection of a variable and more competitive minimum wage proposed by the National Commission of Audit, to the over-broad ‘workplace relations framework’ directions to the Productivity Commission” Mr Bisits said.

“The recent revelation that Seven-11 workers were paid beneath the minimum wage raised many contradictions (where was the FWC? where were the unions? what was the extent of exploitation?) none of which evoked an official response.”

As it did at the end of the Gillard government, the HR Nicholls Society has called on the government to end the most egregious defects of the current Fair Work system.

As it did at the beginning of the Abbott government, the society has proposed that those defects be examined and resolved by actual workers and employers (in a group appointed by the government for the purpose).

And effective IR practices in other countries have to be examined and emulated: see those of Germany in the last ten years, where flexibility, firm-level agreements, and a non-statutory system have resulted in one of the world’s strongest economies, with 5% unemployment and the lowest youth unemployment[1].

“The HR Nicholls Society calls on Mr Turnbull to begin to restore freedom of employment by tackling immediate or pressing defects of the Fair Work system” Mr Bisits said.  “These include terms of employment to only relate to genuine employment issues, employment agreements to be binding, and making practical the Productivity Commission’s report.”

For Further Information:

Adam Bisits                                                                  Kyle Kutasi

President, HR Nicholls Society                           Vice President

adam.bisits@bisits.com                                          kkutasi@gmail.com

[1] From the February 17 2015 address of Professor Bernd Fitzenberger (then Freiburg University, now of Humboldt University) to the National Press Club, Canberra, part of an Australian  speaking tour organised by the society

 

0438 405 527                                                                0433123865

 

Note on the HR Nicholls Society

The society will hold its annual conference on Saturday 28 November 2015 to examine the draft Productivity Commission report on workplace relations, the Trade Union Royal Commission, coastal shipping reform and other IR issues.  It is hoped the government will be represented at the conference.

[1] From the February 17 2015 address of Professor Bernd Fitzenberger (then Freiburg University, now of Humboldt University) to the National Press Club, Canberra, part of an Australian  speaking tour organised by the society